14 9 / 2014

"I have to go to the hospital? Well, I was just hoping you’d give me a water pill to make the swelling go down. Are you sure this is serious?"

—Severely edematous (swollen from fluid leaking out of her blood vessels into her soft tissues) and dyspneic (having trouble breathing) woman, proving that women can also Downplay the Symptoms.

And just for fun, I’ve put together a list of all the "serious" tests and interventions that this woman underwent after getting admitted to the hospital for what turned out to be severe Congestive Heart Failure + Pulmonary Hypertension, exacerbated by years of smoking and drinking:

  • Chest xrays (fluid on the lungs!)
  • Chest CAT scan (LOTS of fluid in the lungs!)
  • Chest and Heart Ultrasound (DAMN that’s a lot of fluid — and oh look, her heart is pumping at 1/5th of expected efficiency!)
  • Pleurocentesis (sticking a needle into the space between the lung and the ribcage to drain out fluid)
  • Ultrasound of her stomach (yep, fluid in there too!)
  • Abdominal Pericentesis (another day, another needle, another drainage)
  • Ultrasound of her veins and arteries in her legs and arms (them veins are in bad shape!)
  • Days of IV diuresis (to make her pee out all the extra liquid — after 4 days, 20 liters have left the building!)
  • Mechanical breathing support (until her lung fluid got emptied out)
  • Consults of pulmonologists, cardiologists, general surgeons, and vascular surgeons (to do all the procedures)

Guess I should’ve just sent her home with a water pill, huh? :)

(Source: cranquis, via cranquis)

14 9 / 2014

eclipperton:

Do your guys’ professors use the word “cartoon” to describe a drawing? And is this normal? One of my undergrad professors used to do it too, but I thought it was just him. Now all of my professors do it. Am I the only one that’s like, ‘wtf that’s not a cartoon?’

Not a cartoon:

A cartoon:

YES!! I HATE IT WHEN THEY DO THAT.

14 9 / 2014

jonnyrocker80 said: Hi-interesting blog. Just wanted your opinion. Respirologists at Sick Kids in Toronto said that immunizing immune compromised toddlers is risky until they get past their condition. Our daughter has asthma induced by any number of allergens and toxins. Puffers do almost nothing for her. Her immune system is building nicely as of recently, so we will probably be getting her immunized some time soon. They said our instincts for not doing it earlier were good. We trust them and ourselves. Thoughts?

The public health impact of vaccines is to reduce fatalities and complications from diseases who are caused by organisms with vaccine-able (that’s a scientific word folks) pathology, and to utilize healthy immune systems to shield those with compromised immune systems, who cannot receive most vaccines.

Obviously your case is not run of the mill and you held off for a reason that wasn’t based in pseudoscience or simple willful disregard of facts. If only I had more thumbs with which to give you a hundred thumbs up! Glad your daughter is doing well. :)

14 9 / 2014

futuredoctorweirdo:

kendrawcandraw:

I’m quitting life to become a burrito, bbl

This, change of plans, fuck med school, becoming burrito.

14 9 / 2014

wayfaringmd:

As a current medical student in the armed forces, a lot of emphasis is placed on leadership as a way of life, not as something to be “checked off” on a residency or medical school application. I happen to be pretty shy and soft-spoken, and I don’t eloquently vocalize my…

14 9 / 2014

descantforhope:

drwalshnd:

Sunday Spa Day: Coffee
Here in Seattle, we drink a lot of coffee. After making that delicious pot of organic, fair trade, shade-grown, rainforest-friendly, locally-roasted *ahem* coffee, what do you do with leftover grounds? Sure, you can dump them on the compost pile or add them to the garden, but you can also re-use them for some easy home spa treatments. After trying several recipes, here are my favorites:
Shower scrub:
The easiest to do. Take your cooled, used coffee grounds right into the shower and use as an exfoliating scrub. Adding oils (sweet almond oil, olive oil) or mixing equal parts granulated sugar and coffee grounds will boost exfoliation and make your skin feel even smoother. Bonus—skin will feel firmer, too, owing to the skin-plumping leftover caffeine.
Face mask:
You need finely-ground (espresso grind) coffee for this. Mix a few tablespoons cooled used coffee grounds with an egg yolk or 3 tbsp yogurt until a thick paste forms. Alternately, use 1 tbsp ground flax and let the mixture sit until it thickens. You can add a bit of coconut oil, honey, or water to change the mixture’s consistency. Apply to clean skin and rinse after 15-20 minutes.
Hair treatment:
In the shower, add a handful of coffee grounds to your regular shampoo and lather up. It will exfoliate your scalp and rinse clean. Best for oily hair and removing product buildup, and it won’t change your hair color.
If you want to use coffee as a natural hair dye, you can cold-brew strong coffee overnight, rinse your hair with it, put it under a cap for an hour, and then wash it. The color will only build up with consecutive uses.
Tips:
Coarse grinds are better for exfoliation and fine grinds are better for masks.
Careful with flavored coffee! That cinnamon-flavored brew is tasty, but will make your skin itch.
Use a fine grind if you’re concerned about clogging your drain.
Photo credit: Coffee Scoop (by Oberazzi)

Added to self care to do list. I was just worrying about how very acidic out compost must be by now

descantforhope:

drwalshnd:

Sunday Spa Day: Coffee

Here in Seattle, we drink a lot of coffee. After making that delicious pot of organic, fair trade, shade-grown, rainforest-friendly, locally-roasted *ahem* coffee, what do you do with leftover grounds? Sure, you can dump them on the compost pile or add them to the garden, but you can also re-use them for some easy home spa treatments. After trying several recipes, here are my favorites:

Shower scrub:

The easiest to do. Take your cooled, used coffee grounds right into the shower and use as an exfoliating scrub. Adding oils (sweet almond oil, olive oil) or mixing equal parts granulated sugar and coffee grounds will boost exfoliation and make your skin feel even smoother. Bonus—skin will feel firmer, too, owing to the skin-plumping leftover caffeine.

Face mask:

You need finely-ground (espresso grind) coffee for this. Mix a few tablespoons cooled used coffee grounds with an egg yolk or 3 tbsp yogurt until a thick paste forms. Alternately, use 1 tbsp ground flax and let the mixture sit until it thickens. You can add a bit of coconut oil, honey, or water to change the mixture’s consistency. Apply to clean skin and rinse after 15-20 minutes.

Hair treatment:

In the shower, add a handful of coffee grounds to your regular shampoo and lather up. It will exfoliate your scalp and rinse clean. Best for oily hair and removing product buildup, and it won’t change your hair color.

If you want to use coffee as a natural hair dye, you can cold-brew strong coffee overnight, rinse your hair with it, put it under a cap for an hour, and then wash it. The color will only build up with consecutive uses.

Tips:

  • Coarse grinds are better for exfoliation and fine grinds are better for masks.
  • Careful with flavored coffee! That cinnamon-flavored brew is tasty, but will make your skin itch.
  • Use a fine grind if you’re concerned about clogging your drain.

Photo credit: Coffee Scoop (by Oberazzi)

Added to self care to do list. I was just worrying about how very acidic out compost must be by now

13 9 / 2014

Hey! I was wondering, how did you study in third year? For us we spend 1 week on each “system” so we had our first week on cardiology, and I noticed we get very few lectures and a lot of it is just learning on the wards. It seems like we’re just expected to do our own readings and figure stuff…

13 9 / 2014

letsponderthis said: Any tips on how to get the "cadaver lab" smell off? Sometimes I feel like I still smell like it after I shower...

medmonkey:

wayfaringmd:

It’s probably not you that stinks. It’s probably your nose. The smell can stick in your nose even after you’ve showered. 

Sniff a dryer lint sheet or lemon (or lemon scented candle). They’re strong enough to usually wipe out the smell. 

Or, it’s your hair. Citrus scent in your shampoo AND conditioner. Get used to two showers a day.

(PS you’re hungry in lab coz of chemicals, not coz you’re creepy. Probably.)

I washed my cadaver scrubs with bleach and oxyclean. It kinda helped them not be quite so rancid.

13 9 / 2014

Anonymous said: Know of any anaesthesia medblrs?

Nope. But @wayfaringmd has a HUUUUUGE compendium ‘o medblrs. Check it out!

13 9 / 2014

Doesn’t apply to short white coats.

13 9 / 2014

witchyindie said: Do you know any surgeon specific medblrs?

Other than @incisiontime, who is a surgery resident, I don’t know any off the top of my head. Any other medblrs destined for surgery?

13 9 / 2014

Anonymous said: Ah ok. It's not that much different than nursing clinicals then. We get assigned patients and then have to try to assess their vitals and chart everything we can about them, along with making care plans (which are really really dumb). But most of the time we feel like we're running around with out heads cut off, so I understand. Thanks though:)

Were you the nursing student I fist-bumped earlier?

13 9 / 2014

study-hack:

Power Naps are a great way to boost your energy in the middle of the day!

If you are feeling drowsy and tired and still have a ton of homework to do, take a 20-30 minute power nap! It doesn’t take too much time and helps increase productivity

1. They are most effective if they last 15-20 minutes;
2. They are good of alertness and motor performance
3. BETTER than caffeine. Caffeine just postpones your fatigue, while power naps actually get rid of it. 

Best time of day to take a nap: 1-3 p.m. If taken after 4 p.m., you may disturb your sleep at night. 

Sources + More Info: 1, 2, 3

Happy napping! 

(via mademoisellepremed)

13 9 / 2014

Anonymous said: So I'm a nursing major and I was curious as to what kind of things you do as a med student during clinical hours. I've never had the opportunity to ask a med student what they do exactly so I figured you could tell me :) thanks!

It depends on the service. I’m on internal medicine right now, and the med students have a handful of patients we follow and our job is to know everything about the patient. Then after rounds we usually do various things to help the residents out. We have a shelf exam to study for at the end of the rotation, and there are lectures and sometimes quizzes during the rotation as well.

Mostly though we are clueless and trying to not be in the way.

13 9 / 2014

Anonymous said: So I am that anon. Sorry for making you mad and giving the impression of laziness. I worked really hard to get A's in Organic and get in BioChem. Personally I find it really interesting because a lot of things overlap with stuff from cell biology. I asked because I have a list of topics already and have sources (from scifinder & others). But which to start with was difficult. I guess that was my fault for not elaborating? PKU is in my top 3 (others being albinism and methylation disorders) sorry

Hey.

Ok, thanks for explaining! Next time put that in your original ask, all right? It is a crucial bit of info. I, and other medblrs, get a lot of messages that are blantant attempts to get us to write personal statements and application essays, and it gets old real fast. I jumped to conclusions and made assumptions, so I apologize if my initial response hurt your feelings and made you feel unwelcome.

Pick whichever one piques your interest. Whichever one you could see yourself getting a little excited about for whatever reason. If possible, check out some of the social aspects of those disorders. See how it affects people’s lives.

Good luck!