23 7 / 2014

lookingformyownwings said: do you think someone can get into a good med school with a C on their transcript?

I did.

I had *gasp* a couple B’s too.

Heads up: so did pretty much every medblr. ROLL CALL GUYS, LET US SHARE OUR LITANY OF GPA MISDEEDS WITH THE PREMEDLINGS.

22 7 / 2014

futuredoctorweirdo:

captainmudphud:

No lies or exaggerations, but I found preclinical years to be miserable. It just constantly felt like an academic beat down. Any excitement and enthusiasm I had was stomped out of me with the endless parade of flaming hoops to jump through. So far third year has been so completely different. Don’t…

Word. This is hard, but I love it. Not a thought that I had much over the past two years! Really only on Wednesdays (my clinic day both years).

Third year rules.

22 7 / 2014

ladykaymd:

GUESS WHO’S THE AUTHOR OF THE NEWEST ARTICLE OVER AT INTRAINING?? 

THIS GIRL!!! :) :) 

I am just the most excited to be writing over at inTraining!! If you aren’t already subscribed to them here on tumblr (intrainingdoc) or subscribed to their newsletter from their website— GET ON THAT!!! 

It’s an amazing publication written by med students (like me!!) on everything from health policy issues to personal narratives. 

Go go go go! Do it now!! (And while you’re at it, read this awesome article I wrote!!) 

22 7 / 2014

md-admissions:

"We can’t save everyone…though we try."

My resident says this with a sigh to our six man team: him, two interns, my fellow 4th year, the third year, and I, slouched, curled, and slumped in various positions on plastic rolling chairs in the unusually quiet 7th floor workroom at 6PM. No one wants to go home. Everyone feels a responsibility that tethers them to the hospital, that does not disappear, even when your heavy white coat is hung in a closet or thrown on the floor.  

***

Read More

22 7 / 2014

Sailor Moon would have been significantly shorter if the jewelry zombies had been a little faster and bitier.

22 7 / 2014

I’m really happy her nails are the first thing to happen when Sailor Moon transforms because that business takes time to dry!

22 7 / 2014

22 7 / 2014

medicaljourney:

lunedeamour:

medicaljourney:

Med school prep - books every pre-med student should read
(Taken with instagram)
Book list:
Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Dr. Atul Gawande
The Mindful Medical Student by Dr. Jeremy Spiegel
Informed Consent: The U.S. Medical Education System Explained by Dr. Benjamin J. Brown
The Medical School Interview by Dr. Jeremiah Fleenor
Med School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Medical School Experience by  Dr. Robert H. Miller and Dr. Dan Bissell
The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook by Dr. Suzanne M. Miller
Becoming a Physician: A Practical and Creative Guide to Planning a Career in Medicine by Dr. Jennifer Danek and Dr. Marita Danek
On Call: A Doctor’s Days and Nights in Residency by Dr. Emily Transue
Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years by Dr. Michael J. Collins
Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis by Dr. Lisa Sanders
Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland


I need to remember these.



whoa, can’t believe I made this post nearly 2 years ago. glad to see it’s still going strong

'Lord of the Rings' and 'Harry Potter' aren't on here anywhere, this list is clearly incomplete.

medicaljourney:

lunedeamour:

medicaljourney:

Med school prep - books every pre-med student should read

(Taken with instagram)

Book list:

Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Dr. Atul Gawande

The Mindful Medical Student by Dr. Jeremy Spiegel

Informed Consent: The U.S. Medical Education System Explained by Dr. Benjamin J. Brown

The Medical School Interview by Dr. Jeremiah Fleenor

Med School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Medical School Experience by Dr. Robert H. Miller and Dr. Dan Bissell

The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook by Dr. Suzanne M. Miller

Becoming a Physician: A Practical and Creative Guide to Planning a Career in Medicine by Dr. Jennifer Danek and Dr. Marita Danek

On Call: A Doctor’s Days and Nights in Residency by Dr. Emily Transue

Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years by Dr. Michael J. Collins

Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis by Dr. Lisa Sanders

Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland

I need to remember these.

whoa, can’t believe I made this post nearly 2 years ago. glad to see it’s still going strong

'Lord of the Rings' and 'Harry Potter' aren't on here anywhere, this list is clearly incomplete.

(via mrspediatricpa)

22 7 / 2014

Crying for food all morning is exhausting!!

Crying for food all morning is exhausting!!

22 7 / 2014

sevenib said: How are you paying for medical school if you don't mind me asking. We're scholarships practically given to you or did you have to fight for them.

I am in the Air Force going to med school on the HPSP scholarship, which involved payback years serving in the military. Apparently some years are more competitive than others for that scholarship.

I don’t know about non-military scholarships, but I don’t think there are many. I would check with the schools you are interested in applying to and see what they have available.

22 7 / 2014

Anonymous said: Do you know of any jobs in the medical field that a pre med student can have without having to be certified in anything?

I worked in the care management department setting up home health, home medical equipment, and acute/subacute rehab and whatever else they needed me to do, I also worked in bed control for a minute.

I think you could also be a unit secretary on the floor, or a scribe in the ER( randommomentsdevida did that I believe). There are lots of jobs in hospitals and doctors offices, just check their online listings!

22 7 / 2014

gomerblogworld:

Read more: http://bit.ly/1wUHZ3C

Roger the Resident in Tears, Freed from Medicine Captivity

 

St. Louis, MO – Roger Springfield, a 28 year-old internal medicine resident at St. Louis University Hospital, was rescued last weekend by conservationists after being abused and held captive for nearly three years. Roger cried when he realized he was being set free.

What is this flowing substance?

What is this flowing substance?

“Roger was in pain, immense pain from all the note writing,” said Pamela Brooks, founder of Residents SOS.

“His scrubs and white coat were tattered and bloodied. He was barefoot. He was bound so tightly by his schedule, just worked to the bone. He was in the hospital thirty hours at a time, sometimes working weeks in a row without a day off. He was pimped, scutted ruthlessly. Attendings scolded him. He was isolated in a dank, dark call room without bed sheets and a pillow that could be measured in millimeters in thickness. He was sleep deprived and poorly fed, surviving on graham crackers, saltines, the nurse’s candy drawer, and caffeine alone. Sometimes, his captors would make him admit on clinic days. Talk about an act of cruelty.”

Under the cover of night float, a team of conservationists, anthropologists, and psychiatrists, through the direction of Residents SOS, rescued the abused Roger, though not without some resistance. Roger’s medicine program captor tried to chain him down further with work rounds, PowerPoint presentations, and overnight calls, but to no avail.

Residents SOS learned of Roger’s medicine captivity from numerous witnesses.

“He was listless,” said Myra Stevens, a clinic patient of Roger. “He looked so pale and thin. Whenever I could, I provided him with water and bread while he sat at the computer typing notes.”

“He reeked, occasionally smelling of frank urine,” said Simone Jones, a nurse on Unit 32 who has worked with Roger. “I offered to comfort him, even bathe him, but he usually just mumbled something about needing to write discharge summaries and vanished.”

Members of Residents SOS reported that the rescue was incredibly emotional, with tears streaming down Roger’s face.

“Residents are beautiful and smart creatures,” said psychiatrist Erica Mayfield, a member of the Resident SOS rescue team. “They are capable of emotion. When he realized what was happening, that the rescue was actually likely to succeed, he couldn’t hold back the tears. We offered him warm milk, covered him with his childhood blanket, and started talking to him softly, comforting him.”

Roger spent several days at the Resident Conservation and Care Center in St. Louis, where his physical and emotional wounds were addressed. He met with other residents, including three rescued earlier this month from surgical, pediatric, and gynecologic captivities, and bonded over their plight. He was slowly introduced to sunlight and human contact, and is reportedly doing very well.

Later today, Roger will reunite with his family and friends, many of whom he hasn’t seen since he was kidnapped from medical school and placed into medicine captivity in the summer of 2011, under the guise of “The Match.”  Many had lost hope and doubted whether they would see Roger again.

“I wouldn’t wish this ordeal upon even my worst enemy,” said Roger’s mother Barbara. “He’s home now and we can let the healing begin.”

According to Mayfield, medical residents can live up to a hundred years. She believes that Roger the resident has at least ten more years ahead of him not including the 3-6 years to recover from the atrocities of residency.

Read more on http://www.gomerblog.com/2014/07/medicine-captivity/


www.gomerblog.com
#Full_Articles, #Internal_Medicine 3 year residency, captivity Full Articles, Internal Medicine

20 7 / 2014

Anonymous said: every time I go to SDN and look at the what these guys are saying I get depressed, I mean, they make it look like you need to be a freaking genius/charity-king/superhuman in order to be even considered for an interview in a med school. Is getting into med school really this impossible? :(

NO. IT IS NOT IMPOSSIBLE.

GET OFF SDN.

THEY SUCK.
ACTUALLY SAYING THEY SUCK IS AN INSULT TO THINGS LIKE VACUUMS.

SRSLY THE ONLY REASON TO GO THERE IS IF YOU LIKE BEING SAD AND WE HAVE ASPCA COMMERCIALS FOR THAT.

IF YOU ARE LIKE “HMMM SDN SAID THAT I WONDER IF IT’S TRUE.” THE ANSWER IS NO IT PROBABLY ISN’T. LIKE CLOROX LEVEL CLEAN 99.9% PROBABLY OK.

20 7 / 2014

Reading Case Files in Neuro on the notability app (10/10 AspDocs would recommend, ps) and I put smiley faces next to the ones I get right because I dunno I like smiley faces ok… But somehow it always looks like a gargoyle drew these smiley faces and I know my drawing professors are probably upset right now (sorry guys).

Reading Case Files in Neuro on the notability app (10/10 AspDocs would recommend, ps) and I put smiley faces next to the ones I get right because I dunno I like smiley faces ok… But somehow it always looks like a gargoyle drew these smiley faces and I know my drawing professors are probably upset right now (sorry guys).

20 7 / 2014

Anonymous said: How was your step 1 score...I mean are you happy with it?

Yeah, bruh.